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How were the Japanese treated at internment camps?

How were the Japanese treated at internment camps?

The camps were surrounded by barbed-wire fences patrolled by armed guards who had instructions to shoot anyone who tried to leave. Although there were a few isolated incidents of internees’ being shot and killed, as well as more numerous examples of preventable suffering, the camps generally were run humanely.

How many internment camps were there in America?

10 camps

What is the difference between internment camps and concentration camps?

Internment is the imprisonment of people, commonly in large groups, without charges or intent to file charges. Interned persons may be held in prisons or in facilities known as internment camps, also known as concentration camps.

Are concentration camps still standing today?

Today, the site of Auschwitz-Birkenau endures as the leading symbol of the terror of the Holocaust. Its iconic status is such that every year it registers a record number of visitors — 2.3 million last year alone.

What was the nicest concentration camp?

Majdanek

Where are the stairs of death Mauthausen?

The rock quarry in Mauthausen was at the base of the “Stairs of Death”. Prisoners were forced to carry roughly-hewn blocks of stone – often weighing as much as 50 kilograms (110 lb) – up the 186 stairs, one prisoner behind the other.

How many prisoners died in Mauthausen?

On 5 May 1945 the US Army reached Gusen and Mauthausen. Some prisoners were in such a weakened state that many still died in the days and weeks after liberation. Of a total of around 190,000 people imprisoned in the Mauthausen concentration camp and its subcamps over seven years, at least 90,000 died.

Where is the biggest concentration camp?

Auschwitz, also known as Auschwitz-Birkenau, opened in 1940 and was the largest of the Nazi concentration and death camps. Located in southern Poland, Auschwitz initially served as a detention center for political prisoners.